Solutions to Seagate Sector Access Interruption (Part Two)

If it is not easy to judge, we would like to suggest to delete some entries in defect lists, and after that we do logical scan again. If LBA value of the new bad point is smaller than the old one, that means starting sector of bad point moves backward. And in ideal environment (there is only one bad point), this scan result can prove it is miss entries that caused sector access interruption. Because when the new bad point moves backward, it means that some previous good sectors can not be normally read out anymore, which is to say, we deleted some valuable entries, and it is exactly missing entries caused sector access interruption, and in this situation, we need to try to add entries in V40 list and V10 list; But if LBA value of the new bad point is larger than the old one, that means starting sector of bad point moves forward. And in ideal environment(there is only one bad point), this scan result can prove it is redundant entries that caused sector access interruption. Because when the new bad point moves forward, it means that some previous bad sectors can be read out this time, which is to say, we deleted some needless entries, and it is exactly redundant entries that caused sector access interruption, and in this situation, we need to try to delete entries in V40 list and V10 list.

In our frequently-used MRT Three-step strategy, we delete entries in batch as the operation is easy to operate, but the effect of this operation is certainly not as good as to delete entries one by one. We can see whether bad point moves backward or forward by deleting entries one by one, so as to see if the deleted entry is necessary or redundant.

For example, if one bad point locates at PBA address of 0x123456, and entries in V40 list are as follows:
V40
1234